Furniture for living, for life.

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The season of mists and mellow fruitfulness is upon us, and we’re really excited to share the fruits of our recent labours.

Autumn '21 collection
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£65


Characteristics

A mid-Victorian painted pine chest in pale green, of two short over two long drawers on a plinth base. Showing age related wear and with some minor paint loss, in particular around the knobs, otherwise in good condition.

Technical Information

Date: 19th century
Height: 83.5 cm
Width:  88 cm
Depth: 51 cm

Sustainability

The average piece of furniture generates approximately 47kg of carbon dioxide equivalents – roughly the same as burning 5.3 gallons of petrol. Buying this item second-hand versus a newly made equivalent recovers the energy used to make it, rather than generating further emissions and using new materials.

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£65


Characteristics

An Indian rectangular iron bound coffer with brass carrying handles. The lid and front panel are decorated with brass studds, forming a pretty geometric pattern. It stands on turned bun feet, and the interior has a candle storage section inserted. In very good condition for its age and use.

Technical Information

Date: 20th century
Height: 43 cm
Width: 96 cm
Depth: 44 cm

Sustainability

The average piece of furniture generates approximately 47kg of carbon dioxide equivalents – roughly the same as burning 5.3 gallons of petrol. Buying this item second-hand versus a newly made equivalent recovers the energy used to make it, rather than generating further emissions and using new materials.

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£25


Characteristics

A small mahogany two-tier bedside table with single drawer. A repaired split through the top, some minor dark circular water stains on the lower tier and other very minor signs of use. In good condition. 

Technical Information

Date: 19th century
Height: 78 cm
Width: 40 cm
Depth 37 cm

Sustainability

The average piece of furniture generates approximately 47kg of carbon dioxide equivalents – roughly the same as burning 5.3 gallons of petrol. Buying this item second-hand versus a newly made equivalent recovers the energy used to make it, rather than generating further emissions and using new materials.

ship icon

£25


Characteristics

A small oak side table with single frieze drawer on turned legs. A lovely patina and evidence of repairs as to be expected with age and use.

Technical Information

Date: 19th century
Height: 76 cm
Width: 53.5 cm
Depth 38 cm

Sustainability

The average piece of furniture generates approximately 47kg of carbon dioxide equivalents – roughly the same as burning 5.3 gallons of petrol. Buying this item second-hand versus a newly made equivalent recovers the energy used to make it, rather than generating further emissions and using new materials.

Second hand, not second best

Every year in the UK we throw out c. 22 million pieces of furniture, totalling 1.6m tonnes. Most of this is buried in landfill or burnt in an incinerator.

Today we are generally all trying to lead increasingly conscious and sustainable lives, but there often remains a disconnect when it comes to buying furniture. Why is this?

As part of a 2021 consumer survey, participants were asked to list the most important considerations when purchasing new furniture. Environmental Reasons came out as least important (The Green Interior – Reusing Furniture for a Sustainable Future, Scott, 2021). Even though this group all demonstrated strong feelings about leading a sustainable lifestyle, the most important considerations when buying new furniture were design, functionality and convenience. The carbon footprint or materials used were also of less importance, however these details can often be difficult to come by - how many of us have been surprised that our supposedly UK made item has a 13 week lead time?

Many of us have some second-hand furniture at home. The thrill is often in the chase: hunting for exactly what we need through auction houses and flea markets. But the majority (75.2% of the Green Interior survey respondents) still always buy new furniture. The most commonly cited reasons were quality assurance and inconvenience.

Quality assurance, or lack thereof, is an oft-cited reason not to buy second hand.

But perhaps there can be some confusion between condition and quality. Signs of previous use do not always equal bad production. Likewise, just because an item is new does not mean that it has been well made.

Inconvenience is another major theme. You find something online that you like the look of, but it’s 300 miles away in a regional auction house, who produce limited, grainy photos and a vague (at best) condition report. You buy it in the sale, having forgotten to add the 30% Buyers’ Premium, then are told you have to organise shipping within 5 days or you’ll be charged for storage. After spending a small fortune on last minute shipping it arrives, the drawers are sticking or the leg wobbles worryingly and there is no way that you can return it.

Suddenly finding a trusted retailer of new furniture starts to look significantly easier and (after all the unseen extras) looks like relatively good value – no surprises, reasonable shipping to your door at a day of your choosing, job done.

What if...

But what if there was an easier way to buy quality-assured second hand furniture?

We should all be able to make sustainable choices about how we furnish our homes, for both style and comfort, without compromising on integrity.

PearTree was founded with a simple ambition: to make the sourcing of truly sustainable, restored furniture easy. Our collection is both highly convenient, as everything we have for sale is ready to go, and quality assured - our buyback scheme allows you to trade-in your pre-loved PearTree items in the future.

Shop the collection

Alice Wrobel recipe: Pears with Ham and Fennel

On first inspection ham and pears might seem like a curious pairing, but the sweetness of the fruit and sticky fennel sits perfectly against the saltiness of the smoked ham. Read the recipe

Our latest blog post: What a waste

c. 50%, or 0.8 million tonnes, of the furniture is thrown away each year is perfectly reusable, so why aren’t we reusing it? Read the blog post

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